Resources & past events

This page displays all the resources developed during past DH events and meetings

– African Digital Storytelling Symposium @University of Kansas, videos of day 1 and day 2

Africa forum at DH2020 with video links

Outcomes of Digital Humanities: the perspective of Africa

– Poster session at DH2019 in Utrecht

– Panel at DH2019 in Utrecht

African Digital Humanities @University of Kansas


Workshop
Digital Humanities: the perspective of Africa

The workshop took place the week before DH2019 in Leiden, The Netherlands. Below you will find the links to the presentations, the shared and individual projects and other outcomes of the workshop.

You really touched me 
Oh! You truly touched me
By your words and acts
And your kind hearted hearts 
From home and across the seas
My soul is glad as it sees
And witnesses how beautiful 
The world so plenty and full
With handsomely beautiful creatures
From diverse worldviews and cultures 
United at the altar of love
Of Digital Humanities’ alcove

And at Noordwijk beachsides
Same as the love which never hides
Openly embracing from motherland 
Felt close enough even in the Dutchland

All these I feel and feel and know
And never will forget never nor now
That humanity lives truly, everywhere 
Here, found I it, and so everywhere

Oh! What a world so beautiful!
Blessed with many yet so peaceful
A people that know how to touch 
With knowledge, that can vouch
That a life was truly touched 
Yesterday
And Today,
And the morrow 
Of the next morrow

(July 4 2019, Lorentz Center,  Leiden University, The Netherlands)

Poster session at DH2019

Several posters were prepared during the workshop and presented in a special session at DH2019:


Panel at DH2019
African Languages and Digital Humanities: Challenges And Solutions

The field of African language technology (De Pauw et al. 2011; Ndinga-Koumba-Binza and Bosch 2012; Amadou Dia 2014) has seen a rapid development in recent years, and several digital humanities projects and hubs have been established across the continent. Language documentation projects have focused on several endangered and minority languages, producing large digital corpora and data sets for African under-described languages. What is the place of African languages in the African digital landscape and what is the state-of-the-art of African digital scholarship? What are the challenges and the solutions for a DH approach in the field of African languages and linguistics? What are the good practices for building African-based repositories, language infrastructures and other digital capabilities? What is a sustainable model for the engagement of wider audiences and for digital capacity building in Africa? How can we address ethical issues and the “tension” between the trend towards open access and the need to protect privacy and property rights of community speakers and researchers?
The panel brings together scholars from different backgrounds (computational linguistics, natural language processing, language documentation and description) to answer these and other related questions and to share the experiences of scholars who are directly involved in DH research in Africa and in the management of African-based digital archives, repositories and infrastructures. In this way we hope to have a first bird’s eye-view of DH research for African languages, which will allow a critical discussion of the nature and future of the field.